The Price To Play

Discussion in 'Talk About Alan's Albums' started by hollyh, Nov 29, 2009.

  1. hollyh

    hollyh Founder Member

    Here's a thread to discuss this 1966 Alan Price Set LP...

    TRACKLIST:

    Medley: Barefootin' - Let's Go Baby (Where The Action Is) -
    Land of 1000 Dances
    Just Once In My Life
    Goin' Down Slow
    Getting Mighty Crowded
    Honky Tonk
    Move On Drifter
    Mercy, Mercy
    Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
    Ain't That Peculiar
    I Can't Turn You Loose
    Critic's Choice
    Hi-Lili, Hi-Lo

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Jim H

    Jim H New Member

    It took me a few years to track this one down before the era of the internet. I've always thought it had a Zoot Money feel about it. Good album.
     
  3. hollyh

    hollyh Founder Member

    Do you have a vinyl copy, Jim? I now have all those tracks on the House That Jack Built compilation, but I never did have this in vinyl. Oh, the years I spent combing record bins, snapping up every Alan Price compilation I could find! And still, here were all these tracks that I'd never heard, having discovered Alan's solo career only in 1973.

    I know what you mean about the Zoot Money feel. Alan certainly showed off his keyboard skills on this one. It's interesting how on the one hand, he could do standard pop songs like "Just Once In My Life" (Goffin/King were major Brill Building songwriters) but also tear into classic blues songs like "Goin' Down Slow," or R&B like "Mercy Mercy" and "I Can't Turn You Loose." It's like he was drunk on his own versatility!

    I've read that he said he didn't want to do "Hi Lili Hi Lo" (a corny movie theme song -- didn't Doris Day sing it first?), but his mother asked him to do it, because her nickname was Lily. It does seem an odd choice, but man, he makes that song SMOKE.
     
  4. Jim H

    Jim H New Member

    I bought the vinyl album in Aug. 1981 probably through an auction in Record Collector or Goldmine. I can remember hearing Hi Lili Hi Lo when I was a kid. Eve Boswell recorded it first in 1953 and Richard Chamberlain had a hit with it in 1963. I like Alan's version but prefer the version by Manfred Mann, released just before Alan's.
     

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